Ballantyne Magazine

FALL 2018

Ballantyne Magazine covers news, events, real estate, restaurants, shopping, health, schools and business in the upscale Ballantyne Area of Charlotte, NC.

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See Yourself Here? Share with us your creative projects and you could be featured on this page. Contact Jodi Greenwald at jgreenwald@ballantynemagazine.com. The magazine staff reviews submissions and consults with Matt Olin at CreativeMornings/Charlotte, www.charlotteiscreative.com. C R E A T I V E S P A R K Trash to Trashion Artist turns discarded items into art By Jodi Werner Greenwald | Photo by Ray Sepesy SEE YOURSELF HERE? Share with us your creative ideas or projects, and you could be featured on this page. To be considered, send a brief description and any accompanying imagery to Jodi Greenwald at jgreenwald@ballantynemagazine.com. C R E A T I V E S P A R K Vintage Vibe Local Resident Fashions Wearable Art By Matt Olin and Jodi Werner Greenwald | Photo by Ray Sepesy In this edition of "Creative Spark," Morris shares her creative process with Matt Olin from CreativeMorn- ings/Charlotte, www.charlotteiscreative.com. What was your original "spark" of inspiration? The altered couture styles I discovered on Etsy. But the more I searched, the more what I wanted was in my own head. That was the beginning of my "self-taught" adventure. From where do you source your vintage textiles? In the beginning, it was my mom being an excellent early-bird hunter at yard sales. I now have contacts that specialize in sell- ing vintage linens. Friends and customers also donate beauti- ful linens to me to repurpose. How long does it take to create a single garment? From two hours to two days. Sometimes I will look at a large tablecloth for hours, hold it up at different angles, plan the cuts around the patterns. If it's big and beautiful, I pray over it. I have to get up enough nerve to cut it. I can't imagine being a surgeon. Do you have a favorite piece? My current favorite is one I dyed an eggplant shade because it was stained. It merged per- fectly with a faux suede jacket I rescued from a thrift store. Is there creative tension inherent in creating clothes that are both works of art and something practical to be worn? Mixing prints can be a chal- lenge from an aesthetic standpoint as well as a wearable one. Cer- tain prints and colors have a lot more range of flattery than oth- ers. Early on I decided if I could merge unpredictable elements and keep it comfortable, I would have a successful line of clothing. What's up next? I have big plans for my little scraps. Nothing should go to waste. I would like to see a whole separate product line produced from my leftover pieces. The cus- tomer would be informed at point of purchase that a portion of each sale goes to help a specific charity. Anything else you'd like to tell us? I am a single mother who started on a shoestring budget. My most valuable trade secret is my mom. She tags, trims, runs errands and picks up all the slack when I travel to shows. She's my amazing sweat- equity, dependable business partner. Cara Morris creates wearable art from the basement of her Ballantyne home. She sells her one-of-a-kind pieces at boutiques, art shows and on her website, www.runway45.com. In 2016, she won "Best in Show" at Waxhaw's Kaleidoscope Fest. C R E A T I V E S P A R K Written Legacy Simple Notes, Letters Enrich the Human Spirit By Matt Olin and Jodi Werner Greenwald | Photo by Ray Sepesy What was it like growing up as the "dreamer" in your family? I think being the dreamer was a direct result of being the middle child. Thinking outside the box was a necessity early in life. Find- ing creative ways to stand out and express one's self is essential for everyone. The middle child learns to do it a little earlier than most. What's been most challeng- ing about creating your book, "A Life through Letters"? Making sure that I captured the spirit in which my father wrote his original letters. That was ever present in my work. It was such an honor to posthu- mously co-write with my father, and I wanted to get it right. How did you keep yourself motivated and accountable to see this project through? I had worked on the project starting in early 2013. Then in January 2015 I simply decided that was the year I was publish- ing the book. I picked a date and would not let myself stop until it was completed. I would often think of the struggles my father had in his life due to his physical limitations. That always kept me motivated. How do you want your book to make others feel? I hope this book inspires people to connect. We all have people in our lives with whom we should be in touch. A simple note or letter has such a tre- mendous impact on the human spirit. Emails can be deleted in a fraction of a second. As I say in the book, letters can last a lifetime — and sometimes beyond. Where are favorite spots in Ballantyne to get inspired? Rush espresso, hands down. I spent a tremendous amount of time there while working on the book. It is where I go to write, connect and create. Paul and Jenny have done an amazing job of creating a space that feels like a community. Anything else to share? I see letter writing as a way to preserve one's legacy. One of the very fortunate by-products of this project is that I now have a living, breathing tribute to my father and our entire family from which my two little boys can learn. I would encourage everyone to take the time to capture that same legacy and put their own stamp on it. FOR MORE INFORMATION http://www.alifethroughletters.com https://creativemornings.com/cities/clt Ballantyne author Ashley Davis found inspiration in his father's handwritten letters and published them in a curated collection. In our first Creative Spark — a collaboration with Matt Olin and the CreativeMornings/CLT team — Davis shares with us the joys and challenges of his creative process. BALLANTYNE SPRING 2017 96 Creative Spark C R E A T I V E S P A R K Written Legacy Simple Notes, Letters Enrich the Human Spirit By Matt Olin and Jodi Werner Greenwald | Photo by Ray S epesy What was it like growing up as the "dreamer" in your family? I think being the dreamer was a direct result of being the middle child. Thinking outside the box was a necessity early in life. Find- ing creative ways to stand out and express one's self is essential for everyone. The middle child learns to do it a little earlier than most. What's been most challeng- ing about creating your book, "A Life through Letters"? Making sure that I captured the spirit in which my father wrote his original letters. That was ever present in my work. It was such an honor to posthu- mously co-write with my father, and I wanted to get it right. How did you keep yourself motivated and accountable to see this project through? I had worked on the project starting in early 2013. Then in January 2015 I simply decided that was the year I was publish- ing the book. I picked a date and would not let myself stop until it was completed. I would often think of the struggles my father had in his life due to his physical limitations. That always kept me motivated. How do you want your book to make others feel? I hope this book inspires people to connect. We all have people in our lives with whom we should be in touch. A simple note or letter has such a tre- mendous impact on the human spirit. Emails can be deleted in a fraction of a second. As I say in the book, letters can last a lifetime — and sometimes beyond. Where are favorite spots in Ballantyne to get inspired? Rush espresso, hands down. I spent a tremendous amount of time there while working on the book. It is where I go to write, connect and create. Paul and Jenny have done an amazing job of creating a space that feels like a community. Anything else to share? I see letter writing as a way to preserve one's legacy. One of the very fortunate by-products of this project is that I now have a living, breathing tribute to my father and our entire family from which my two little boys can learn. I would encourage everyone to take the time to capture that same legacy and put their own stamp on it. FOR MORE INFORMATION http://www.alifethroughletters.com https://creativemornings.com/cities/clt Ballantyne author Ashley Davis found inspiration in his father's handwritten letters and published them in a curated collection. In our first Creative Spark — a collaboration with Matt Olin and the CreativeMornings/CLT team — Davis shares with us the joys and challenges of his creative process. BALLANTYNE SPRING 2017 96 Creative Spark BALLANTYNE SUMMER 2017 96 Creative Spark C R E A T I V E S P A R K Written Legacy Simple Notes, Letters Enrich the Human Spirit By Matt Olin and Jodi Werner Greenwald | Photo by Ray Sepesy What was it like growing up as the "dreamer" in your family? I think being the dreamer was a direct result of being the middle child. Thinking outside the box was a necessity early in life. Find- ing creative ways to stand out and express one's self is essential for everyone. The middle child learns to do it a little earlier than most. What's been most challeng- ing about creating your book, "A Life through Letters"? Making sure that I captured the spirit in which my father wrote his original letters. That was ever present in my work. It was such an honor to posthu- mously co-write with my father, and I wanted to get it right. How did you keep yourself motivated and accountable to see this project through? I had worked on the project starting in early 2013. Then in January 2015 I simply decided that was the year I was publish- ing the book. I picked a date and would not let myself stop until it was completed. I would often think of the struggles my father had in his life due to his physical limitations. That always kept me motivated. How do you want your book to make others feel? I hope this book inspires people to connect. We all have people in our lives with whom we should be in touch. A simple note or letter has such a tre- mendous impact on the human spirit. Emails can be deleted in a fraction of a second. As I say in the book, letters can last a lifetime — and sometimes beyond. Where are favorite spots in Ballantyne to get inspired? Rush espresso, hands down. I spent a tremendous amount of time there while working on the book. It is where I go to write, connect and create. Paul and Jenny have done an amazing job of creating a space that feels like a community. Anything else to share? I see letter writing as a way to preserve one's legacy. One of the very fortunate by-products of this project is that I now have a living, breathing tribute to my father and our entire family from which my two little boys can learn. I would encourage everyone to take the time to capture that same legacy and put their own stamp on it. FOR MORE INFORMATION http://www.alifethroughletters.com https://creativemornings.com/cities/clt Ballantyne author Ashley Davis found inspiration in his father's handwritten letters and published them in a curated collection. In our first Creative Spark — a collaboration with Matt Olin and the CreativeMornings/CLT team — Davis shares with us the joys and challenges of his creative process. BALLANTYNE SPRING 2017 96 Creative Spark How did you get into trashion? I have always loved the feeling of creating something from nothing, perhaps due to growing up with relatively little. I learned to be resourceful and creative with what I had and never felt the lack. In fact, I feel that it has benefited me greatly and really fueled my artistic abilities. My first exposure to trashion was an EcoFab Trash Couture runway show 5-6 years ago. I have since participated in several runway shows per year. What inspires you? With trashion, I am most inspired by the materials and enjoy the challenge of transforming everyday, recognizable items into wearable art. I also like to think about the structure and shape the materials will take on the human canvas to make sure the looks are flattering and evoke a sense of avant-garde fashion and skilled design. In more traditional art mediums, my inspiration is life experiences and the desire to share and connect with others. In my city scenes, I portray with colors and textures what I felt when walking the streets and interacting with new people and cultures. How do your professional and artistic roles inform each other? My pursuit of art outside of the workplace continues to make me better at my job. I wish there were a better appreciation for the role of the arts in education. Creative problem solving and visual communication are skills that would benefit any career. How did this magazine become a dress creation? The name of the piece is "Paper Cut," which is a play on conservation as well as the physical result of many hours of folding paper! There is just something about the feeling of turning pages that I don't think we can ever replace. I found when I asked friends and coworkers for magazines to work with, this is the one that they had saved the most. You have created live art at The Ballantyne. What was that like? I found the social aspect energizing. I chose to work on an encaustic piece, which is a medium of beeswax, dammar resin and pigments that is manipulated using heat. It's something most people haven't seen before, and the process is interesting to watch. Anything else to share? I invite readers to collect one thing that they would typically discard — bottle caps, packing materials, newspapers — for one month, and make something beautiful with it! Visual artist Teresa Rench focuses on oils, encaustics and mosaics. One of her "trashion" dresses is composed of Ballantyne Magazine pages. Her studio is located above Awaken Gallery at The Studios at 107 West in Mount Holly, and her art can be found at www.teresarench.com and www.facebook.com/renchgallery. By day, she leads a digital design team for Wells Fargo. BALLANTYNE FALL 2018 96 Creative Spark

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